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20130113
20130121
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
're going to face it again, you know, debt ceiling stuff, what is the republican strategy in dealing with the democrats? david. >> you know, mike, i was on capitol hill this week talking to top republicans, and i'm getting a sense and you're seeing it written about as well, that they would maybe like to step away from the brink about the debt ceiling. they do want to force the issue about how can they get this president to agree to additional spending cuts? the debt ceiling is a dangerous game. i think they recognize that politically. they'll push -- the question is how -- how do they push on the debt ceiling? do they say, look, we'll give you a short-term extension of the debt ceiling for a certain amount of spending cuts, or we'll give you a long-term extension like you want for even more spending cuts. can they force entitlement reform around medicare, for instance, even some of the -- in their view -- more limited things that the president wants to do around means testing and age and indexing to try to attach that to a debt-limit deal. do they move beyond the debt limit, try to g
that this deal now would have to include an extension of the debt ceiling that they just got to avoid the fiscal cliff. well, he ultimately folded on that. so as a tactical matter, even in their minority position, they can look at this and see, well, there is some gain to be gotten here if we keep pushing on this. i think the flip side of this is also a big challenge for the president. if he really wants to unshackle the economy, if he wants to get more robust economic growth, does he not want to be more proactive about dealing with some of these entitlements, with dealing with the budget picture, even where he has real problems with his supposed, you know, partners in this to republicans? does he not want to take advantage of the power he has to try to advance this, to get more robust economic growth independent of his misgivings about his partners here on capitol hill. >> chuck, i think it's fair to say that harry reid was somewhat marginalized during negotiation biden sort of swooped in to save the day. what do you see as his role going forward as we edge toward these upcoming fiscal cliffs?
had word that gop controlled house might have a deal. might vote next week to raise the debt ceiling for even three months. there is a very muted reaction and what to watch here are how people are buying etfs. this is the s&p 500. you can buy it in a single stock and you might say, oh, gee, there is a move there to the far right on the upside when the announcement came. but it is a very, very narrow amplitude. very narrow range of trading. that's about three points on the s&p 500. the volume did pick up and we will have volume towards the heavy side today. if you think that is good news pushing the debt ceiling out for stocks and i think generally would you look at it as good news, it certainly is fairly muted here. as for the major indices for the week, what simon was just talking about, there are deeper cyclical changes. big industrial names have been generally outperforming and that is very good news, if you think the global economy, those stocks would more closer would the global economy. >> you get this, this real tight hugging of the flat line friday. monday, tuesday, wednesday
and the time we deal with the debt ceiling and we may meet the goal which we set out to do, which is to have roughly a $4 trillion cut over 10 years in the long-term deficit and to put us on that path. but i didn't come here to talk about any of those important subjects today, because as important as they all are today we have a more urgent and immediate call and that is how to deal with the epidemic of gun violence in america. you all know the statistics better than anyone so i'm not going to repeat them. on that score, i owe an incredible debt of gratitude to you at the head table and those of you in the room. i know we don't have unanimity in this ballroom nor do we in any ballroom, but we all acknowledge that we have to do something. we have to act. and i hope we all agree, there is a need to respond to the carnage on our streets and in our schools. i hope we all agree that mass shootings like the one we witnessed in newtown 34 days ago cannot be continued to be tolerated. that tragedy has affected the public psyche in a way i have never seen before. the image of first graders, not only
with a clean debt ceiling race, he has to mike a final resolution. the public, not the republicans, the public wants spending cuts. he needs to go along with sequestration and find ways to cut government, shows that republicans are doing anything. boehner is a survivor, not really a leader. >> we'll have more after this break on the two presidents. what are the president's biggest challenges he faces going into this second term? stay with us. at 1:45, the aflac duck was brought in with multiple lacerations to the wing and a fractured beak. surgery was successful, but he will be in a cast until it is fully healed, possibly several months. so, if the duck isn't able to work, how will he pay for his living expenses? aflac. like his rent and car payments? aflac. what about gas and groceries? aflac. cell phone? aflac, but i doubt he'll be using his phone for quite a while cause like i said, he has a fractured beak. [ male announcer ] send the aflac duck a get-well card at getwellduck.com. ya. alright, another one just like that. right in the old bucket. good toss! see that's much better! that was g
of the senate voted against a debt ceiling increase and in previous aspects of american history president reagan in 1985, president george herbert walker bush, president clinton, in 1997 all signed deficit reduction deals were contingent mon or in con connection with raising the don't ceiling. you done that four times. three times related to defecit reduction and maneuvers. what chuck and i are curious about that desire not to negotiate, when that contrasts with the modern american presidents and your own history on the debt ceiling because that suggests we will go into a default situation because no one is talking to each other how to resolve this? >> no, major. i think if you look at the history, getting votes for the debt ceiling is always difficult and budgets in this town are always difficult. i went through this just last year, but what's different is we never saw a situation as we saw last year in which certain groups in congress took such an absolutist position, that we came within, a few days of defaulting. and you know, the fact of the matter is, that we have never seen the debt ceilin
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)